Trans books that changed my life: The Basics

| Apr 10, 2017

Welcome to the Page Pundit!

As many of you know, I work at a bookstore.  Currently.  And I read a LOT.  Like many TGs who are living their Truth, I’ve read many books about being Trans.

Most people read the same books: She’s Not There, My Husband Betty, Whipping Girl, Wrapped in Blue. . . .

I chose a couple of those, but not all for this column. My reasons are my own.


I’ve given this a lot of thought. As a former English teacher (and current book store drone) I obviously read many many books. But changed my life?

She’s Not There by Jennifer Finney Boylan

She's Not There

She’s Not There

This book needs no introduction as most of you have read it. Jenny states in Stuck in the Middle With You that she realizes that her transition was very unusual, as everything broke her way. It was one of the first books I read on the topic by a transwoman. And still one of the best. I have had the pleasure of discussing this book with JFB, and reviewing it in my blog. I’ve sold many copies of this book at the bookstore by recommending it.

Wrapped in Blue by Donna Rose

Another early TG read. Donna’s story is so inspirational. She endured horrific pain, and came through it stronger. I met Donna some years ago (she is my “big sister” Mel’s “big sister”) and many times since. I am proud to call her friend. Her conversational, candid writing style is a great influence on my blog. She is still one of my heroines.

Trans sister Radio by Chris Bohjalian

A TG book by a major cisgender author. I was planning my transition when I was recommended this book. It’s a bit dated, but the truth it contains is still valid: not everyone accepts us . . . but we must accept ourselves.

I am Not Myself these Days by Josh Kilmer Purcell

I am not myself these days

I Am Not Myself These Days

A memoir about an advertising executive by day and drag queen by night. I read this before that fateful Halloween 2008 when I rediscovered myself, but the cracks were beginning to show. I was ashamed to be seen reading the book, because I felt someone would guess my secret. In this book, I discovered an underground world so vastly different than my own, populated by strange and wonderful people who were living far more genuinely than I was. At the end of the book, there are crossdressing tips that I followed when getting ready for Halloween 2008. I have met JKP several times, and we periodically message each other on Facialbook. He offers constructive criticism of my writing. He was another example of living one’s life openly and truthfully. I’ve sold many copies of this book at the bookstore by recommending it.

You may have noticed a common thread in these books. That’s the point I think. In the end, despite all the pain, I am living honestly. Books can teach us a great many things, as long as our mind is open to hearing what they say, and learning.

Oh, and if you never looked at my blog, here is the link.  Seriously.  Have a look.  You may even like it.

Be Well

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Category: Body & Soul, Fun & Entertainment, Product Review

Sophie Lynne

About Sophie Lynne: http://sophielynne1.blogspot.com/ : http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/projects/storywall/transgender-today/stories/sophie-lynne : http://articles.philly.com/2016-06-29/news/74075409_1_transgender-students-gender-identity-transgender-people

Comments (1)

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  1. Bibrary says:

    I’ve loved all of Jennifer’s books. In fact, I got an early read of her upcoming novel (Long Black Veil), and it was fantastic. As much as I loved She’s Not There, it’s Growing Up Haunted that has always stuck with me.